Stop Global Warming By Dimming The SUN! UV-Blocking Aerosols Could Be Sprayed Into The Stratosphere By 2033 (But Some Warn The Results Will Be 'Catastrophic')

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Scientists are now suggesting an unusual way to control climate change by spewing sun-dimming chemicals into the Earth's atmosphere.  A procedure called stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) could cut the rate of global warming in half, according to the scientists.  The research was directed by researchers at Harvard and Yale universities. Their research was issued in the journal Environmental Research Letters.


The technique involves scattering large sums of sulphate particles into the Earth's lower stratosphere at altitudes as high as 12 miles. According to the scientists, they will transport the sulphates with specifically designed high-altitude aircraft, balloons or large naval-style guns. The study does, however, admit that the method is hypothetical right now.

There is no current technology or aircraft appropriate for adaptation but the team say the required structure could be developed in 15 years’ time.

They say they are 'developing a new, purpose-built tanker with 'substantial payload capabilities' and would neither be 'technologically difficult nor prohibitively expensive.'

The cost of developing the SAI system is projected at £2.7 billion ($3.5 bn) with running costs of £1.7 billion ($2.25 bn) a year.
The report states: 'We make no judgment about the desirability of SAI. We simply show that a hypothetical deployment program commencing 15 years hence, while both highly uncertain and ambitious, would indeed be technically possible from an engineering perspective. It would also be remarkably inexpensive.'

The team admit that there would be dangerous perils with the system.

Coordination between numerous nations in both hemispheres would be compulsory.



Apart from that they say the SAI methods could risk agriculture, cause droughts or cause life-threatening weather.

Dr. Gergot Wagner from Harvard University's School of Engineering and co-author of the study said: 'Given the potential benefits of halving average projected increases in radiative forcing from a particular date onward, these numbers invoke the ''incredible economics'' of solar geoengineering.  Dozens of countries could fund such a program, and the required technology is not particularly exotic.'
David Archer from the department of geophysical science at the University of Chicago told CNN: 'The problem with engineering climate in this way is that it's only a temporary Band-Aid covering a problem that will persist essentially forever. It will be tempting to continue to procrastinate on cleaning up our energy system, but we'd be leaving the planet on a form of life-support.  If a future generation failed to pay their climate bill they would get all of our warming all at once.'


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