The Paradoxes That May Tear Modern Cosmology Apart

The concepts or more precisely “theories”, that physicists have amassed over the centuries to illuminate our understanding of the cosmos are, in the end, paradoxical. When theories that clarify the movement of things here on our home Earth are applied to bigger astrophysical objects like galaxies, for instance, the rules fall apart. Here are few of the confusing paradoxes that presently govern physics:
1. So far the observational data shows the universe is expanding. Galaxies, for example, are stirring away from each other. But galaxies, counting our own Milky Way, are stationary in space. So it is not galaxies travelling through the emptiness of space that create movement, but space itself that is intensifying to thrust galaxies to and fro. Unfortunately, the formation of space is not a physical occurrence that has been verified, i.e., we cannot confirm that it is happening.
 
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2. Depending on a method called redshift, we also observe that the farther away a body is from Earth, the faster it is travelling away from us. The universe, as we know it, is expanding at an accelerating level. But what energy or force is triggering this acceleration? According to the law of the conservation of energy, energy cannot be generated from nothing. This difficulty is "solved" by postulating dark energy, and whoever can first describe that how dark matter is causing this acceleration or what actually this dark matter is and how it works, has a Nobel Prize with their name already on it.

3. An important principle of Einstein's theory of relativity is that the universe is identical, i.e., it looks the same from any point of view if observed as a whole. But this is varying with observational data that goes against the Hubble Law asserting "the cosmological redshift of an object is linearly proportional to its distance from Earth." It is tempting to consider that the progresses made in the last hundred years have cleared up our sight of the cosmos and that apparently unified theories like the Big Bang cover all cosmic happenings. But modern cosmology still cannot provide any clarifications for thoughtful observable events.

You can read the issued paper at Physics arXiv.

This post was written by Umer Abrar. To contact the author of this post, write to mirzavadoodulbaig@gmail.com or add/follow him on facebook :

The Paradoxes That May Tear Modern Cosmology Apart The Paradoxes That May Tear Modern Cosmology Apart Reviewed by Umer Abrar on 2/04/2015 Rating: 5

2 comments:

  1. I think maybe you misunderstand what a paradox is. These aren't unsolvable problems, they're just as yet unsolved. A paradox is a problem that is recursive in that it's solution is also the problem itself. A good example of a paradox is the grandfather paradox, where if you were to travel to the past and kill your grandfather before he procreated to bring your parent into existence, that should make it so you never existed, and so you wouldn't have been able to go back in time and kill your grandfather in the first place.
    Another very basic example of a paradox is the unstoppable force/immovable object. If the unstoppable force were to collide with the immovable object, what would be the result? The immovable object can't be moved by the unstoppable force, and the unstoppable force can't be stopped by the immovable object. So this creates an unsolvable problem.
    Also, there are some flaws in your paper; galaxies aren't stationary in space. They move independently through space at thousands of miles per hour. In fact, our closest neighboring major galaxy, Andromeda, is on a collision course with us as it is moving toward us, and us toward it, at a high velocity. The expanding universe has very little influence on this motion. It is driven by gravity between the stellar bodies.

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  2. I think maybe you misunderstand what a paradox is. These aren't unsolvable problems, they're just as yet unsolved. A paradox is a problem that is recursive in that it's solution is also the problem itself. A good example of a paradox is the grandfather paradox, where if you were to travel to the past and kill your grandfather before he procreated to bring your parent into existence, that should make it so you never existed, and so you wouldn't have been able to go back in time and kill your grandfather in the first place.
    Another very basic example of a paradox is the unstoppable force/immovable object. If the unstoppable force were to collide with the immovable object, what would be the result? The immovable object can't be moved by the unstoppable force, and the unstoppable force can't be stopped by the immovable object. So this creates an unsolvable problem.
    Also, there are some flaws in your paper; galaxies aren't stationary in space. They move independently through space at thousands of miles per hour. In fact, our closest neighboring major galaxy, Andromeda, is on a collision course with us as it is moving toward us, and us toward it, at a high velocity. The expanding universe has very little influence on this motion. It is driven by gravity between the stellar bodies.

    ReplyDelete

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