Lockheed Martin's new Compact Fusion Reactor might change humanity forever

This is an invention that might possibly modify the civilization as we know it: A compact fusion reactor presented by Skunk Works, the stealth experimental technology section of Lockheed Martin. It's about the size of a jet engine and it can power airplanes, most likely spaceships, and cities. Skunk Works state that it will be operational in 10 years. Aviation Week had completeaccess to their stealthy workshops and spoke to Dr. Thomas McGuire, the leader of Skunk Work's Revolutionary Technology section. And ground-breaking it is, certainly: Instead of utilizing the similar strategy that everyone else is using— the Soviet-derived tokamak, a torus in which magnetic fields limit the fusion reaction with a enormous energy cost and thus tiny energy production abilities—Skunk Works' Compact Fusion Reactor has a fundamentally different methodology to anything people have tried before. Here are the two of those techniques for contrast:
The old-style Soviet tokamak scheme of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, a huge system being constructed in France.
The Skunk Works' recent compact fusion reactor design.


The crucial point in the Skunk Works arrangement is their tube-like design, which permits them to avoid one of the boundaries of usual fusion reactor designs, which are very restricted in the sum of plasma they can sustain, which makes them giant in size—like the gigantic International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. According to McGuire: “The traditional tokamak designs can only hold so much plasma, and we call that the beta limit. Their plasma ratio is 5% or so of the confining pressure. We should be able to go to 100% or beyond.” This design lets it to be 10 times smaller at the same power output of somewhat like the ITER, which is anticipated to produce 500 MW in the 2020s. This is essential for the use of fusion in all kind of uses, not only in huge, costly power plants. Skunk Works is committed that their structure—which will be only the size of a jet engine—will be capable enough to power almost everything, from spacecraft to airplanes to vessels—and obviously scale up to a much bigger size. McGuire also claims that at the size of the ITER, it will be able to produce 10 times more energy.

The one thing here to remind everyone is that Lockheed Martin is not a stupid dude working in a garage. It's one of the world's major aerospace and military corporations. McGuire also understands that they are just starting now, but he says that the architecture of this compact fusion reactor is sound and they will progress rapidly until its final operation in just a decade:
“We would like to get to a prototype in five generations. If we can meet our plan of doing a design-build-test generation every year, that will put us at about five years, and we've already shown we can do that in the lab. So it wouldn't be at full power, like a working concept reactor, but basically just showing that all the physics works.”

After five years, they believe to have a completely operative model prepared to go into full-scale construction, capable of producing 100MW— which is enough to power a huge cargo ship or a 80,000-home city—and its size will be 23 x 42 feet only which is quite amazing. 
This post was written by Umer Abrar. To contact the author of this post, write to mirzavadoodulbaig@gmail.com or add/follow him on facebook :

Lockheed Martin's new Compact Fusion Reactor might change humanity forever Lockheed Martin's new Compact Fusion Reactor might change humanity forever Reviewed by Umer Abrar on 2/28/2015 Rating: 5

19 comments:

  1. "The one thing here to remind everyone is that Lockheed Martin is not a stupid dude working in a garage."

    Yeah the last thing we need is some stupid dude inventing something in his garage. Tell it to Steve Jobs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve job is so overrated.... he did nothing at all.... Dennis MacAlistair Ritchie (September 9, 1941 – c. October 12, 2011) was an American computer scientist. He created the C programming language and, with long-time colleague Ken Thompson, the Unix operating system. He died the same year Steve did.... without Dennis there wouldn't have been any windows, Linux,Unix, firefox, Playstation, Xbox, photoshop. 90% of the applications are written in C++..... i haven't use any apple product in my whole life.... Steve is so much overrated...!!!!!

      Delete
    2. How much do you know about Dennis???

      Delete
    3. And C++ isn't C -- C++ was Bjarne Stroustrup's creation. So much for that argument. Even if Jobs is overrated.

      Delete
    4. All of the user-interface stuff you see today on computers and other software based on object-oriented programming can be traced back to Xerox PARC and the Smalltalk programming language - it could be argued that C set us back a decade or more. Anyways, while the corporate types at Xerox didn't recognize what they had and the techies there apparently weren't effective at communicating that to their bosses, Steve Jobs immediately recognized the potential of what he saw there and brought it to market in a big way (and did the same thing with other technologies....that was his genius).

      Even Thomas Edison who is generally recognized as our greatest inventor was more than happy to steal ideas from others and build a better mouse trap.

      Delete
    5. are you actually serious? um, apple just partnered with ibm and yahoo....great movie huh bro?

      Delete
    6. I would also like to add that none of you know what you're talking about when it comes to operating systems and user interfaces, those are two different types of layering altogether, which means, you all are just going to argue back and forth while nothing gets accomplished

      Delete
    7. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_machine

      Delete
    8. Creating a personal computer- even in the late 1970s- was like working with Lincoln Logs compared to making a working fusion reactor. It's something of a completely different order. Jobs made a clever, highly marketable product- but it's not like he invented the transistors that made it go, he just applied a smart aesthetic and a brilliant interface to existing technology.

      What Lockheed is doing, if successful (huge 'if' by the way), is the sort of work we have not seen since Edison and the early days of General Electric (or at the very least the invention of the aforementioned transistors and integrated circuits that let things like the Apple computer exist). It's absolutely revolutionary. It will move us to a new epoch of history, much as the widespread initial deployment of electricity did.

      Delete
    9. My guess is that it is already field in classified projects.

      Delete
  2. Well -- Steve Jobs did work in his garage. But he wasn't stupid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The point is that while Steve was a certifiable genus, it was as a marketing and business person, not as an inventor. Steve himself invented nothing of significance.

      Delete
    2. Was he certified a genius? I don't think the marketing and business aspect qualify him as such. What I mean is, was he a member of mensa or had a verified IQ score?

      Delete
    3. The last time I had my IQ measured it would have qualified me for MENSA membership, though that was when I was child. I can unequivocally tell you that genius is not a function of IQ, though it helps. Real genius is much less tangible but you know it when you see it.
      Genius is the extra step beyond the place plain brain power can take you. It's vision, perseverance and energy. Steve was a genius, yes, his business and marketing achievements are proof of that. He didn't build things but he did have a vision for what people wanted and what he could sell them.

      I'm normally on the side of people who say Steve was overrated but that's because he's credited with engineering work he didn't have that much to do with as mentioned above but anyone who thinks Steve didn't have a gift isn't paying attention.

      Delete
  3. Steve Wozniak invented Apple's early computers. Steve Jobs invented Apple, but that was post-garage.

    ReplyDelete
  4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_machine

    ReplyDelete
  5. LM just needed someone to fist "discover" what they already observed from the UFO's in Area51.

    ReplyDelete
  6. How the hell is there not ONE comment here ABOUT THIS FUCKING ARTICLE.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is needed a more updated and affordable project; commercial fusion power plants do not need to be huge and costly as ITER.
    http://youtu.be/u8n7j5k-_G8
    http://youtu.be/VUrt186pWoA

    ReplyDelete

Template images by sololos. Powered by Blogger.